Longing for Ripples and Reflections

The ducks and turtles did not seem to mind the algae (first photo below), but I missed what the light could do playing on the pond’s once clear waters (lower photos). When I wrote about trouble at Menotomy Rocks Park a year ago, I felt sure my town would invest in maintaining the health of Hills pond. But the green scum kept spreading, and I began to worry.

This morning as I walked around the pond, I noticed a sign stating the pond had been treated. When I looked to see if the waters were indeed clearing, a bullfrog croaked as if in confirmation.


An Exchange of Haiku

When I first met Giselle, she suggested I come by for a free Japanese tea ceremony lesson to see if I liked it. I took her up on that offer. After many years of lessons at her house, I added a tea hut (below) to my yard. We kept in touch after she moved to France.

In addition to teaching the traditional Japanese art of tea ceremony, Giselle makes beautiful tea bowls and is a published poet. I was honored when she suggested we work together on a sequence sharing haiku impressions on the subject of MADO (‘window’ in Japanese), as winter turned to spring this Tiger year. MADO is the poetic word given by Japan’s Emperor for 2022.

M A D O  
Kathleen Fink, Arlington, Massachusetts, US &  
Giselle Maya, St. Martin de Castillon, France

gazing out the window
all is stillness in the garden
what does my cat see

way up there 
a flock of birds migrate
across my open window

no one looking in
snow on the tea hut window
no one looking out

fox on his way 
to a morning tea gathering
Sen Sotan invited*

reading by the window
pattering snow whispers

all morning long

sun-warmed nap
Shiki-cat watching goldfinches
mountain’s spring melt

brand new leaves 
capturing raindrops 
one by one

beginning of May
swallows have returned
time to choose a summer tea bowl  

walking this dewy path
a window flashes gold
as dusk descends  

perched
in the olive tree
Tora-cat moon gazing  

* Sen Sotan is the grandson of Sen no Rikyu, the great tea master. Sen Sotan was deeply interested in the Chado tradition and many tea people welcomed him to attend their chakai – sometimes he appeared in the form of a fox.